[ '82 ]

Rev. Paul Martin, Secretary

& Evelyn Place, Princeton, N.J.


Because James. B. Banister is of '82 his classmates have a special interest in “Banister's Shoes.” Some of us have worn them for many years, to the comfort of our soles and souls. Thanks to Jim a pair of Banister Golf Shoes, made to order, has been the highly esteemed first prize at several of the '82 gold tournaments in connection with the reunions. So the notice of the voluntary dissolution of the James A. Banister Company is an appropriate '82 item. This business of making fine shoes, established in Newark in 1845 has successively headed by Isaac Banister, his son, James A. Banister, and his grandson, James B. Banister, who retired from the presidency in 1924. The Banister Shoes have won prizes for excellence of material and workmanship at World's Fairs at Vienna in 1873, at Philadelphia in 1876, at Chicago in 1893, at Paris in 1900 and at St. Louis in 1904. Under changing trade conditions it was decided that the outlook for the future did not warrant the continuance of this company of long and honorable record as makers of the best.


-The Princeton Alumni Weekly             Vol. XXXI, No. 1



James Bryan Banister

November 13, 1860 - December 1, 1943

President of James A. Banister Company from 1906 to 1924

Grandson of Isaac Banister ~ Son of James Albert Banister ~ Older brother of Arthur Chadwick Banister

James B. Banister is deeply interested in the Roseville Brotherhood of Newark, N.J. He has been its honored president for several years. At the annual banquet, recently held, covers were laid for 300 people, and the occasion was most successful. Among the speakers was C. C. Helang, Yale Law School, '20.

At a recent meeting of the 40th Reunion Committee, at the Princeton Club, New York, Robert K. Clard was appointed Chairman of the '82 Golf Committee to arrange for the Class Gold Tournament to be held June 19 on the Princeton links. At this meeting it came out that the Rev. Paul Martin and James B. Banister have been at Pinehurst for early golf practice.

     -The Princeton Alumni Weekly             Vol. XXXI, No. 1

CHICAGO OFFICE

Stock Exchange Building, Chicago, Ill.

Having unequalled facilities, we are prepared to under -take legitimate detective work in any part of the world


Banister James A., Co. (Newark, N.J.)  (represent-

ed by James B. Banister & George M. Denny)

1 Madison av. R. 6020

MERCHANTS  EXCHANGE  NATIONAL  BANK

OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK             257 BROADWAY

PHINEAS C. LOUNSACRY, Pres.    Edward V. Bambier, Cashier.    Edward K. Cherrill, Asst. Cashier

BAN                             58                   BAN


Banister James A., Co. (Newark, N.J.) represented by James B. Banister & George M. Denny) 1 Mad-

ison av.  R.  6020

Union National Bank

Banister James A Co - 185 Washington  Incorporated Jan 1 1892  Capital $100,000 President James B Banister  Secretary George M. Denny  Treasurer John W Denny

James A. Banister Co., manufacturer's of men's fine shoes and slippers, Newark, N.J. sends us a copy of the resolution adopted by the shoe manufacturers of that city as expressing their views concisely, accurately and forcefully. The resolutions read:


Whereas,

Washington dispatches indicate that the Senate Committee has voted to restore the Dingley rate of fifteen per cent duty on hides; and


Whereas,

Not one sound argument has ever been made in favor of this duty; and

          

Whereas,

No one is benefited except those members of the packing industry who make up the so-called “Beef Trust”:


If, therefore, any benefit flows from this duty, it accrues to a numerically small monopoly and works rank injustice to a very large domestic industry, large both as to capital and workers. The duty is not needed as a protection to any interest, and the amount of revenue remaining after rebates have been returned on a leather export is insignificant. The operation of this rebate on exported American-made leather from foreign hides enables the Canadian or any foreign shoe manufacture to buy such leather cheaper than can a Newark manufacturer, who should be entitled to at least as much consideration as a foreigner.

     The foregoing facts have been in one form or another brought repeatedly to the attention of both Houses of Congress, and they have never been gainsaid (?). Therefore be it

     Resolved, That we, the undersigned manufacturers of boots and shoes in the City of Newark, State of New Jersey, respectfully petition you as our Representative from New Jersey, to use your influence for, and vote in favor of free hides, in conformity to the pledge given by the Republican party in its platform to the people prior to the last Presidential election, and to the benefit of the boot and shoe industry of this city and state, and in the best interests of the great shoe-wearing public of the United States.

     We furthermore ask you to present this petition to the Hon. Nelson W. Aldrich, chairman of the Finance Committee.

     (Signed)

               Johnston & Murphy

               Boyden Shoe Co.

               Wm. Dorsch & Sons Shoe Mfg. Co.

               James A. Banister Co.

               Felter & Co.

               Thos. Cort, Inc.

               Charles Cort



- Boot and Shoe Recorder

  May 12, 1909

"No one is benefited except those members of the packing industry who make up the so-called 'Beef Trust.'"

Newark, N.J., Shoe Manufacturers

Complain of Being Injured.


James A. Banister Company, manufacturers of fine boots, shoes and slippers, Newark, N.J. on March 4 had a fire in their factory, and considerable stock was more or less damaged by fire, water and smoke. In the course of insurance adjustment, the insurance company disposed of all such goods, amounting to 4,786 pairs, so the Banister Company claims. Shortly thereafter there appeared  a large advertisement in New York and other papers, and, as the shoe manufactures claimed to have been placed in a harmful light thereby, action was at once instituted to neutralize this harmful effect as much as possible.

     

President (James B.) Banister, of the shoe company, explains matters as follows:

“On March 4 a fire occurred in our factory, and, as a natural consequence, some goods in process of manufacture were destroyed and a great many damaged by fire, smoke and water. The insurance company sold all such goods, amounting to 4,786 pairs, to the salvage company, who in turn, disposed of them to a large retail store in New York City. On the 24th of April, this New York store, by a half-page advertisement in New York and adjoining city papers, advertised a sale of 7,000 pair of Banister's American's finest footwear for gentlemen at $3.85. every pair guaranteed perfect, and using our trade-mark without our consent. While most of the shoes left our factory branded with our trade-mark, all were more or less affected by the fire condition, and few, if any, could be classified as perfect.”


It is unfortunate that these things occur, but in the course of insurance adjustment, everybody seems justified in saving all he can from a disaster; hence reputations may sometimes be more or less injured without intention on the part of another to inflict such consequences. It is simply one of those things that cannot be helped so long as fire insurance companies are entitled to the salvage. Where the great harm comes in is in a buyer of salvage goods being permitted to place them on sale as first-class, made by first-class concern, when the goods have been made injured by the elements. The Banister Company would appear to be justly indignant.


-Hide and Leather


"The Banister Company would appear to be justly indignant."

JAMES B. BANISTER '82


His '82 classmates pay loving tribute to the memory of James Bryan Banister, who died at East Orange, N.H. on December 1, 1943, after a lingering illness of many months, in his eighty-fourth year. He was born in Newark, N.J., and lived his whole life there and in the adjacent East Orange. He retired twenty years ago from the presidency of the Banister Shoe Co., which was founded by his grandfather in 1845 and with which James B. Banister had been connected since his graduation from Princeton. The “Banister Shoe” maintained a reputation as among the finest footwear for men and was awarded first prize in the International Expositions in Vienna, 1873, Philadelphia, 1876, Chicago, 1893, and Paris, 1900. Throughout his half century of residence in the Oranges, he was a citizen ready to render public service and a devoted churchman. He served as president of the board of trustees of the Roseville Ave. Methodist Church, was active in the YMCA and the Newark Home for Crippled Children.


Banister entered Princeton as a freshman from the Newark Academy and graduated with the class in 1882. Throughout his life he had a gift for friendship and the circle of his friends within the class grew from freshman to senior years and in the years since graduation till he drew all his classmates to him. Birthdays and Christmas brought his greetings. One of the chief sources of the unusual class unity and fellowship which has characterized '82 has been the “Jim Banister Golf Parties,” given annually through a series of years, to which he invited not only the '82 golfers for the game, but all the members of the class, within reaching distance, for the good dinner and its merry fellowship, to which his fund of typical “Banister stories” contributed. His was a genial, kindly nature, loyal to his friends, to his class, to Princeton and to whatever cause he espoused. Beneath a lighter vein was a man of spiritual aspiration. In his later years he made a study of hymns and his unfulfilled purpose was to write an hymnology.


Surviving him are a daughter, Mrs. Dwight B. Palmer, of South Orange, N.J., two sisters, two brothers,* grandchildren and great-grandchildren. To this family circle the class extends sincere sympathy.


For the Class of 1882

Andrew J. Barrett     Charles A. Lindsley

Matthew K. Esmer     Edward S. Rankin

Paul Martin











SHOE AND LEATHER REPORTER


     Newark, N.J. – E. A. & T. S. Miller, shoe dealers. The debtors applied last week to the Court of Common Please for the benefit of the insolvency law. Counsel for the James A. Banister Co., shoe manufacturers, opposed the application. He showed that the Messrs. Miller had given chattel (?) mortgage in favor of certain creditors, some of whom were relatives, counting (?) the Banister Co. because they had purchased shoes for $4,300. The application was denied.


SHOE MANUFACTURERS-N.J., N.Y.


Banister, James A. Co., (Inc. $381,900) 370-86 Orange St. (New York office, Bush Terminal Sales Bldg.  James B. Banister, pres't; John W. Denny, treas.; George M. Denny, sec'y; men's and women's fine welts and turns. F. B. Dougherty, supt.; Geo. M. Denny, leather buyer; Wm. Decker, supplies. Makers of the “Banister” shoe. C. (Ret.)


Princeton, 1882: "Banister's Shoes: Some of us have worn them for many years, to the comfort of our soles and souls."

"His was a genial, kindly nature, loyal to his friends, to his class, to Princeton and to whatever cause he espoused. Beneath a lighter vein was a man of spiritual aspiration."

Gravesite for James Bryan Banister

Fairmount Cemetery, Newark, New Jersey

Section Q

Lot 102

Row ?

Front

Above: Hotel Edgemere, Newark, New Jersey -

where James Bryan Banister died at the age of 83.

     James A. Banister Company

                         Newark, N.J., May 8, 1914


Editor Shoe and Leather Facts :


On March 4th a fire occurred in our factory, and as a natural consequence some goods in process of manufacture were destroyed and a great many damaged by fire, smoke and water, The insurance company sold all such goods, accounting to 4786 pairs, to the salvage company, who in turn disposed of them to O'Neill-Adams Company.

     On the 24th of April O'Neil-Adams Company by a half-page ad, in New York and adjoining city papers, advertised sale of 7090 pairs BANISTER'S America's Finest Footwear for Gentlemen at $3.85. Every Pair Guaranteed Perfect, and using our trademark without our consent.

     While most of the shoes left our factory branded with our trade mark, all were more or less affected by the fire condition and few, if any, could be classed as perfect.

     The counsel whom we employ stopped further advertising along this line and put a card for us in the papers announcing our position on the matter.

     It occurred to us that some of your readers might be interested in this matter and we would give you the details you that you may treat is as you think best.  A number of our customers have written us, even from distant points, saying they were affected by this advertisement and were anxious to avoid lowering the standard of our product.


Yours truly,

     JAMES A. BANISTER CO.


JAMES BRYAN BANISTER


Ex-Head of Shoe Firm Founded

By Grandfather in 1845


Special to THE NEW YORK TIMES.


EAST ORANGE, N.J., Dec.1-

James Bryan Banister, retired

president of the Banister Shoe

Company of Newark, died here

today in the Hotel Edgemere at

the age of 83. He was the grandson

of Isaac Banister, who established

the concern in 1845. Banister footwear

took top honors at several world

expositions.


Mr. Banister was graduated from

Newark Academy and Princeton

University. He was a former president

of the board of trustees of the

Roseville Avenue Methodist

Church, and had been active in the

Y.M.C.A. and the Newark Home

for Crippled Children. Mr. Banister

was a member of the Sons of the

American Revolution. He and his

wife, the former Jeanette Ford of

Albany, N.Y., observed the fiftieth

anniversary of their marriage in 1939,

three years before Mrs. Banister's

death. (Thus, James Bryan Banister

and his wife, Jeanette, died within one year of one another after having been married for 53 years.)


Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Dwight

R. G. Palmer; two sisters, Mrs. Harry

Redfield and Mrs. William Talbot; two

Brothers, Albert and Louis Banister;

four grandchildren and two great-

grandchildren.


December 1, 1943



Above: United States Patent Office, 1909.

Boots, shoes and slippers of leather, rubber, and canvas. James A. Banister Company