Correspondences of the

James A. Banister Company

Above:

Newark, N. J. Mar. 2, 1899.

Messrs. T. M. Seabury Co.,

                          Newport, R. I.

          Gentlemen---

                    Replying to your favor of yesterday would say that we have made teh change in the last and wieght of sole on the calf Oxfords as you request. Will sent the russet patches with the first shipment.

                                  Yours truly,

                            James A. Banister Company

                                                     JrH

Above:

Newark, N.J. Mar. 20, 1890

Mr. John Tassell

BOUGHT OF JAMES A. BANISTER.

MANUFACTURERS OF

FINE BOOTS, SHOES AND SLIPPERS, FOR MEN AND BOYS.

                                                                                            185 & 187 Washington Street.

Above:


A STYLISH RUSSET BANISTER


"ENVOY"


THE LATEST IMPORTED ENGLISH

MODEL DRESSY AND COMFORABLE


$7.00


SULLIVAN COMPANY

(J. JOSEPH MCELROY)


                                  159 Westminster Street, Providence, R.I.

                                 ESTABLISHED 1812

Above:

        Highest Quality                     NEVER

Boots, Shoes and Slippers                     EXCELLED

      for Men and Boys


Mr. W. A. Brown

will have great pleasure

in calling upon you about

Wednesday 7/17/'06 (1906)

Above:

POSTAL CARD * ONE CENT

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

                                                             1888

THIS SIDE IS FOR THE ADDRESS ONLY.


Messrs. T. M. Seabury Co.,

Newport,                      

         R. I.                 

Above:

James A. Banister Company,

Newark, N.J.


Howlund-Gow-Stark Co.

Bridgeport, Conn


Above and above right:

JAMES A. BANISTER COMPANY.

               Fine Boots, Shoes and Slippers.

January 10, 1899 (all from 1893-1910)

Board of Directors' Minutes

Howland's, New Link In Store Chain: The store in its next day's newspaper ad, commenting upon the event, stated "The pleasantest feature, apart from the show, is that nobody came to buy, yet there was a great deal of buying done." lie opening day was one long to be remembered. The Wheeler and Wilson band was engaged to play for the big event. Thousands Of Bridgeport flocked to the store which remained open under its kerosene lamps until late that night. Thus, the Howland-Gow-Stark company was launched. Two years later, the store assumed its present name: The Howland Dry Goods company. Shortly afterward, because of the growth of business the large basement was converted for retail tales purposes. With the grand opening, was born Bridgeport's first department store. The store introduced many new departments and a variety of merchandise not previously sold under one roof. One of the attractions that was soon added to the new store was a soda fountain in the basement. Ice cream sodas were dispensed for five cents. Tables were provided for popularly priced luncheons. Within a few years a large addition was made to enlarge the store's overcrowded facilities. In 1900 still more room was needed and land was purchased adjacent to the store. A millinery shop was added along with other departments at this time. In this year Howland's became one of the most modern stores in the whole of New England. A complete electric lighting plant was installed. A pneumatic tube cash system was also installed. The new tube system became almost as big a customer drawer as were the store's daily ads in Bridgeport newspapers. Customers were fascinated by the little tubes that sailed over head on trolley wires. The business continued to expand and in 1904, sorely in need of more room, the company purchased the adjoining brick building- in Caanon street. Three years later the store had once again outgrown its quarters. It was at this time in 1907 that Henry Sanford, a director and owner of the original Howland building, decided to modernize and fireproof the building which by this time went through to Fairfield Avenue. It was Bridgeport's first fireproof building. In 1908 the grand opening of the Sanford-Howland company building took place. There was no alteration sale although these were common practice even in those time's. The company believed sales should be genuine. An alteration sale would have resulted in stock reduction. This was not a Howland policy. However, the opening was celebrated with a sale - one of gigantic proportions. Since the opening of John G. Howland's first store, Bridgeport had grown. The automobile had appeared on the scene and Loco-mobiles were being manufactured here. The gramophone had also made Its appearance. Everyone thought the new building would be adequate for years to come. The expansion program was to continue, however, and in three years the Whiting building in Fairfield Avenue was absorbed. The following year the Taylor building on Cannon street was acquired. In 1927, the Farmer building was added. In 1929 the various properties acquired by the store over a period of years were combined and modernized. Ten years later the second and third floors of the store were redesigned and redecorated. And in. 1948 the Smith-Murray company in Main street became part of Howland's after operating for nearly 40 years as an independent entity. The store had been purchased in 1914 by Howland and Andrew Cooper and had been run under separate management. With the acquisition of Smith- Murray an additional 30.000 square feet of floor space was obtained. At this time the store reached its greatest sales volume in 42 years of operations. In 1944 Sargent F. Eaton, who had come to Howland's as merchandise manager in 1926, was appointed president. Following Mr. Howland's death in 1947 he became chairman of the board. Like his predecessors Mr. Eaton continued' the policies established by the founder. For nearly 71 years the store has tried hard to live up to its slogan, "A Good Store for All the Family All the Time," Mr. Eaton said. "We've operated not only on * policy of true advertising, but on a policy of courtesy and customer satisfaction. Early in its history the store announced publicly "to suit is worth more than any one profit." he said. Out of its high type of customer relationship the store survived the hardships of early growth and the knocks of competitors. Its new owners have promised to continue along the pattern of that same tradition that was founded nearly 71 years ago.


- BRIDGEPORT SUNDAY POST

  (Edited from OCR)



Above:


Form 216





50 Cents Extra for shoes made regular size and in lots of less than 4 pairs.


$1.00 Extra for Shoes made to Measure or on a Last, Altered in any way from regular size.


We Work Exactly to Measure get and never make Allowances or Alterations


We do Not Retail or take Measure from any but dealers.


                                Newark, N.J., Nov. 30 1908


Dear Sir:

     Your order dated _____28 is received.  It shall have prompt attention, and be made as you direct.


Yours Truly,                                                      

JAMES A. BANISTER COMPANY.

42525r1pr. 138014


  The factory will shut down for

Repairs and Inventory between

Christmas and January 3d


Above: Allotment of Shares

Totals 1,000 shares

The following were unanimously elected. - James A. Banister, John W. Denny, James B. Banister & George A. McLellan.

Undated: from 1901-1905

Above:

Jan.12, 1904


Mr. James A. Banister, President,

James A. Banister Co.,

Newark, N.J.


Dear Sirs:-

     By appointment of your Board of Directors, I have this day acted as judge of election of a Board of Directors for the ensuing year. The polls 185 & 187 Washington St., Newark, N.J. The following votes were cast:


James A. Banister          550 shares

John W. Denny             180 shares

James B. Banister          180 shares

George A. McLellan     180 shares

                            Total: 1,000 shares


The following were unanimously elected:- James A. Banister, John W. Denny, James B. Banister, and George A. McLellan.


Yours truly,

Wm. T. Decker